Asian Journal of Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology https://journalajbgmb.com/index.php/AJBGMB <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Asian Journal of Biochemistry, Genetics&nbsp;and&nbsp;Molecular Biology (ISSN: 2582-3698)</strong>&nbsp;aims to publish high-quality papers (<a href="/index.php/AJBGMB/general-guideline-for-authors">Click here for Types of paper</a>). The area of interest of AJBGMB includes but not restricted to all aspects of&nbsp; Biochemistry,&nbsp;Genetics and Molecular Biology. This journal facilitates the research and wishes to publish papers as long as they are technically correct, scientifically motivated. The journal also encourages the submission of useful reports of negative results. This is a quality controlled,&nbsp;OPEN peer-reviewed, open access INTERNATIONAL journal.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> en-US contact@journalajbgmb.com (Asian Journal of Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biolog) contact@journalajbgmb.com (Asian Journal of Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biolog) Wed, 25 Nov 2020 05:08:17 +0000 OJS 3.1.1.4 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Partially Purified 3-Mercaptopyruvate Sulphurtransferase Obtained from the Intestine of Cane Rat (Thryonomys swinderianus) as a Detoxifier of Cyanide https://journalajbgmb.com/index.php/AJBGMB/article/view/30146 <p>Cane rat (<em>Thryonomys swinderianus</em>) is an herbivorous animal which feeds on plant materials, including cassavas that are known to contain cyanogenic glycosides. Cyanide or cyanogenic glycosides are known to be toxic for animal consumption. Therefore, Cane rat must have an inherent mechanism for detoxifying cyanide to be able to survive on its food. Previous works on 3MST have been done on several tissues of cane rats other than the intestine. In this work, we characterized and explored a partially purified 3MST (cyanide detoxifying enzyme) from the intestine of a cane rat for a possible therapeutic source against cyanide poisoning in other mammals that are susceptible to the toxin. 3MST from the intestine of <em>T. swinderianus</em> had a yield of 10.3% with specific activity of 0.21Umg-. The Km and Vmax values of the 3-MST were determined to be 40 mm and 0.20µmol/ml/min respectively for KCN (Potassium Cyanide); also 33.3 mm and 0.15 µmol/ml/min for mercaptoethanol. 3-MST presents in the intestine of <em>T. swinderianus</em> plays a significant role in detoxification of cyanogenic compounds, which makes it an effective target for cyanide poisoning therapy.</p> A. A. Sanni, O. M. Ige, G. B. Olagunju, B. A. Olukade ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://journalajbgmb.com/index.php/AJBGMB/article/view/30146 Wed, 25 Nov 2020 00:00:00 +0000 Comparative Study of Ethanolic Wild African Nutmeg (Pycnanthus angolensis (Welw.) Stem Bark Extract Potentials and Selected Conventional Toothpaste against Hidden Resident Mouth Cavity Microfora https://journalajbgmb.com/index.php/AJBGMB/article/view/30147 <p>The aim of the study is to evaluate and compare the antibacterial activity of ethanolic stem extract of (Wild African nutmeg) <em>Pycnanthus angolensis </em>(Welw.) and some commercially available toothpaste against bacteria isolated from the hidden resident mouth cavity microfora. Bacteria were isolated from swabs of apparently healthy individuals and were identified using Staining procedure biochemical tests and the use of Bergey’s manual of bacteria identification&nbsp; The assay for antibacterial activity of <em>Pycnanthus angolensis</em> stem bark extract and the four toothpastes were determined using agar well diffusion method. The Gram positive bacteria isolated were <em>Streptococcus sangus, Streptococcus ratti,</em> <em>Stomatococcus mucilaginous., Peptostreptococcus&nbsp; sp., </em>and <em>Streptococcus mutans</em> and the Gram negative bacteria were <em>Veillonella atypical, Veillonella parvula, Veillonella dispar </em>and <em>Acidiaminococcus </em>sp. Oral B toothpaste showed maximum efficacy of inhibition with inhibition zone diameter as wide as 20 mm at 100 mg/ml. Percentage frequency distribution of antibacterial activity of conventional toothpaste (Close-up) against hidden resident mouth cavity microfora depicts <em>Acidaminococcus</em> sp.13%, <em>Veillonella parvula </em>(10%), <em>Veillonella dispar</em> (12%),<em> Peptostreptococcus</em>&nbsp; sp.(12%), <em>Stomatococcus mucilaginous</em>.(9%), <em>Streptococcus ratti</em> (13%), <em>Veillonella atypical </em>(11%), <em>Streptococcus sangus</em> (9%) and <em>Streptococcus mutans</em> (11%), Percentage frequency distribution of antibacterial activity of conventional toothpaste (Oral B toothpaste) against hidden resident mouth cavity microfora reveals <em>Acidaminococcus sp</em>.(11%,) <em>Veillonella dispar</em> (11%), <em>Veillonella parvula</em> (10%),<em> Peptostreptococcus</em>&nbsp;sp. (12%), <em>Stomatococcus mucilaginous</em>.(15%), <em>Streptococcus ratti</em> (11%), <em>Veillonella atypical</em> (8%), <em>Streptococcus sangus</em> (10%),&nbsp; and <em>Streptococcus mutans</em> (12%), Percentage frequency distribution&nbsp; of antibacterial activity of conventional toothpaste (MyMy toothpaste) against hidden resident mouth cavity microfora depicts <em>Acidaminococcus</em> sp.(12<em>%),</em><em> Veillonella dispar</em> (9%), <em>Veillonella parvula</em> (8%),<em> Peptostreptococcus </em>sp.(10%), <em>Stomatococcus mucilaginous</em>.(16%), <em>Streptococcus ratti </em>(9%), <em>Veillonella atypical</em> (15%),<em>Streptococcus sangus</em> (9%) and <em>Streptococcus mutans</em> (12%), Percentage frequency distribution of antibacterial activity of conventional toothpaste (Olive toothpaste) against hidden resident mouth cavity microfora shows <em>Acidaminococcus</em> sp.(9%), <em>Veillonella dispar</em> (10%), <em>Veillonella parvula</em> (10%), <em>Peptostreptococcus</em> sp.(12%), <em>Stomatococcus mucilaginous</em>.(13%), <em>Streptococcus ratti </em>(10%) ,<em>Veillonella atypical </em>(17%), <em>Streptococcus sangus</em> (7%),&nbsp; and <em>Streptococcus mutans </em>(12%). <em>Pycnanthus Angolensis</em> stem bark extract inhibited the growth of the oral bacterial isolates with of zones of inhibition diameter ranging from 6 mm to 17 mm at a concentration of 100mg/ml. Secondary metabolite (Phytochemical) screening shows the presence of flavonoids, tannins, saponins, alkaloids, reducing sugars, steroid, phenol, terpenoid, pyrrolozidine alkaloid, glycoside and cardiac glycoside with glycoside and terpenoid most present. However, anthraquinones and volatile oil were absent. With menial antibacterial activity, P. <em>angolensis</em> can be use in the formulation of herbal toothpaste. It should be advocated that<em> Pycnanthus angolensis </em>should be added to our convention toothpaste to improve the functional ingredient of the toothpaste and Plant-based traditional knowledge has become a recognized tool in search for new sources of drugs. It is clear that the use of these herbal plants can offer a platform for further research.</p> mouth cavity microfora., Teniola Temitayo Mary ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://journalajbgmb.com/index.php/AJBGMB/article/view/30147 Thu, 26 Nov 2020 00:00:00 +0000